The Weekly Stripe – 30.10.20

Boo! Sorry to scare you, but it’s almost Halloween, and this week we want to share some scary links, so buckle up and get ready to dive into all things fearful and spine-tingling.

The Weekly Stripe – 30.10.20

It is believed that Halloween has its roots in ancient Celtic festivals. Here, Cady Lang traces the modern day celebration back to Samhain, the pagan festival of death and rebirth.

The Weekly Stripe – 30.10.20

Anthropology has long held an interest in how different people and cultures interpret events and their causes, making Halloween a fascinating time for anthropologists. Emma Louise Backe looks at ethnographies of the past and present seeking to understand the diversity of belief systems that fall outside of the explicable.

The Weekly Stripe – 30.10.20

What makes horror films scary, and why do some people love watching them? The psychology underlying these desires looks to understand the different kinds of stress experienced during films, the role of childhood experiences, and how watching such films can bring people together, as Lindsay Holmes explores. Not into the bloodshed? Here is a list from the New Yorker of horror films without all the gore.

The Weekly Stripe – 30.10.20

Whilst fear is a central theme of Halloween, and we are often told to be fearless in life, philosophy teaches us that it is not fearlessness that we should seek, but the right set of fears. Through Epictetus and Seneca, Elizabeth Azide charts some of philosophy’s approaches to fear.

The Weekly Stripe – 30.10.20

Fear of technology and conspiracy theories have always gone hand in hand. Today it is fear of 5G, and before that it was of power lines, microwaves and TVs. So while “the devices are different, the fears are the same”, as Kaitlyn Tiffany writes on the emergence of such theories.