The Weekly Stripe – 14.05.21

Wine has been drunk throughout human history. In Ancient Greece, it was often mixed with honey and diluted with water. Although its first discovery dates back 6000 years ago, it now exists in abundance in many parts of the world, becoming a staple drink in many cultures. Yet the creative process behind wine creation keeps evolving with new trends shaping its appreciation, production, and even alcohol content. In this week’s Weekly Stripe, we will explore where one of the most beloved beverages is heading to.

The Weekly Stripe – 14.05.21

From the old world to new world producers in Chile and the US, winemakers are exploiting the power of underwater conditions to shape the aromas of their wines. The conditions of the underwater environment mimic a natural wine cellar where constant temperature and absence of light give birth to great wines. 

The Weekly Stripe – 14.05.21

Although production conditions may remain uncertain for the years to come, warming climate trends in the growing season are pushing English and Welsh winemakers to open new vineyards and plant more grape varieties that are popular with consumers. The LSE, in partnership with MET office, aims to support the growing interest in the wine production sector by providing actionable information based on sound science and collaboration between experts.

The Weekly Stripe – 14.05.21

As the current pandemic highlights the vulnerability of our world and human impact on it, there is growing attention to the authenticity of ingredients and viticulture impact on the ecosystem. This survey of wine lovers shows how sustainability takes precedence over organic practices

The Weekly Stripe – 14.05.21

According to the famous wine magazine Decanter, there is a growing trend towards low alcohol and alcohol-free wines. Traditionalists consider it as an aberration; others think it’s part of wine’s future and an opportunity to sell in places, countries and cultures where alcohol is forbidden

The Weekly Stripe – 14.05.21

Although in Georgia orange wine been made for 2,000 years in terracotta amphorae, Marks and Spencers, Sainsbury’s and Asda started selling it only recently riding the wave of the increasing demand. Check out this New Yorker’s article to know more about artisanal production, avoidance of additives, and the careful use of grape skin which give orange wine its beautiful colour